Author Topic: DIY - Cam Chain and Tensioner Guide  (Read 35200 times)

Offline Terry82

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Re: DIY - Cam Chain and Tensioner Guide
« Reply #75 on: December 21, 2017, 04:40:42 PM »
Great write up.
Whats a rough price on parts for this job?

Offline l2azvan

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Re: DIY - Cam Chain and Tensioner Guide
« Reply #76 on: May 14, 2018, 02:13:08 PM »
Hey - let me start off by saying how brilliantly this guide is written. Makes me feel as if I could pretty much do it myself, but heck, I'm still gonna leave it to a mechanic by trade who also has the necessary tools to do it.

Anyhow, I'll be getting it done next week or so and I was wondering if anyone on here has any opinions on using aftermarket parts for this job? I definitely gotta do the chain and the tensioner, and was also recommended to do the adjuster "for the sake of it". But the OEM adjuster'll cost me around 400+ quid alone. Seeing that the car is 10 years old, I thought about using a non-oem adjustor, although, considering how vital the part is to the engine, I am a bit hesitant to do so without further research. I could get the non-oem adjuster for around 130-140 quid, so I'm wondering; is it likely for a part like that to just "go to s***", taking the engine with it? Or would I just be facing a faster wear & tear rate with a non-oem part?

I am always a fan of using OEM parts, but considering the age of the car, dishing out 400 + quid for a part that might actually still be completely fine, makes me think about possible alternatives, to say the least.

Thanks in advance for any opinions!

Found myself in the same position, any thoughts ?

Offline muff1991

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Re: DIY - Cam Chain and Tensioner Guide
« Reply #77 on: June 15, 2018, 03:47:12 PM »
Hi All,

A question for the knowers and a reply for parts rough prices - hope this helps and you can help me.

I'm doing this job tomorrow along with the cambelt & water pump. I will be using this guide, so thanks Rich! I'm sure... i am one of many to use this guide.
Price guide for all parts (Geniune VW) i paid just under£300 - BUT i did get a small discount through my mate. So i would imagine you'd be looking around the £200 mark from TPS for chain and tensioner, gaskets, bolts etc.
i have brought OEM cam locking tools and adjuster socket, but just found out i can borrow them from a mate at Audi so will have both sets to hand.
I'm a little confused as to how the tolerances of the inlet cam or both cams can be out? If you are removing the old chain and replacing it with the new and having to adjust the inlet cam the most tiniest bit (as in not a tooth/link out of timing) how can the tolerances be out? am i right in thinking the timing cannot be adjusted afterwards? just a little confused, as surely if the same amount of links meet the same teeth then surely those no adjustment? i will be marking the cams etc and hope the cams wont move, but after reading... i know they will - hence ill mark up well.
in a nut shell - is there any adjustment that can me made to the inlet cam if it does decide to end up slightly off once new chain is on? i don't think so but thought id ask.
thanks in advance.

Offline mcdoof

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Re: DIY - Cam Chain and Tensioner Guide
« Reply #78 on: July 09, 2018, 01:27:35 AM »
Hey - let me start off by saying how brilliantly this guide is written. Makes me feel as if I could pretty much do it myself, but heck, I'm still gonna leave it to a mechanic by trade who also has the necessary tools to do it.

Anyhow, I'll be getting it done next week or so and I was wondering if anyone on here has any opinions on using aftermarket parts for this job? I definitely gotta do the chain and the tensioner, and was also recommended to do the adjuster "for the sake of it". But the OEM adjuster'll cost me around 400+ quid alone. Seeing that the car is 10 years old, I thought about using a non-oem adjustor, although, considering how vital the part is to the engine, I am a bit hesitant to do so without further research. I could get the non-oem adjuster for around 130-140 quid, so I'm wondering; is it likely for a part like that to just "go to s***", taking the engine with it? Or would I just be facing a faster wear & tear rate with a non-oem part?

I am always a fan of using OEM parts, but considering the age of the car, dishing out 400 + quid for a part that might actually still be completely fine, makes me think about possible alternatives, to say the least.

Thanks in advance for any opinions!

Found myself in the same position, any thoughts ?

I'm in the same boat. Plus there are so many different aftermarket parts. Anyone have some direction on what would be good?

Offline LeBlaaanc

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Re: DIY - Cam Chain and Tensioner Guide
« Reply #79 on: September 30, 2018, 09:41:31 PM »
Any tips getting this off if your tool and bolt rounded out? I’ve built a jig and drilled 3/16 bit through it and hammered a T55 on it and no dice (i understand the head of a bolt give it its holding force). I’m fresh out of ideas, was going to try to drill a slot in it or something. Any help is appreciated.

Offline warpigroadkill

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Re: DIY - Cam Chain and Tensioner Guide
« Reply #80 on: October 23, 2018, 10:57:53 AM »
Thank you for making this guide. I've just done this to my car and it's made a massive difference to the sound of the engine. It's much more quieter and smoother running. I bought a FSi 2.0 timing tool kit from eBay for about £30 and that wasn't worth the money. I ended up going to VW and buying the correct cam holding tool, the correct socket for the exhaust cam bolt, and the lever for the intake cam. These are listed in your initial post, so look there for the part numbers.

Very easy job. I never removed the two PCV pipes at the back of the rocker cover (near the turbo). They were being a pain so I proped up the cover with a piece of wood. That gives you more than enough room to set the cam timing tool in position and do the timing chain/tensioner etc. So don't go breaking those pipes.

The gasket for the rocker cover was very brittle. I covered the open cams and removed the old gasket with a screwdriver, CAREFULLY! Don't break the plastic valve cover.
I searched around for timing belt kits etc and found that the genuine VW parts from the dealership was the cheapest.

After completing this fix and testing to make sure it works, I've followed it up with some CRC intake valve cleaner, oil and plug change and the car runs like a beaut. Doesn't sound like a diesel tank anymore  :happy2:
« Last Edit: October 23, 2018, 10:59:52 AM by warpigroadkill »
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